PRIMARY

How case studies will help you to review, refresh and renew the history curriculum

Michael Maddison

Consultant

In this session, we will discuss what subject leaders and teachers are doing in primary schools across the country to review, refresh and renew their history curricula. The session will clarify why the National Curriculum is your friend, point out the freedoms that exist, and suggest solutions to many of the common constraints that influence planning. These key aspects will be explored through case studies of different schools, and we will have the opportunity to analyse and discuss how a number of schools have reviewed, refreshed and renewed their curricula. As a result, you will hopefully leave with ideas on what changes you might make and the confidence now to make those changes.

Friday: 10.45–11.45

Early Years, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2

Using an enquiry-based approach to explore and critically evaluate life in Roman Britain

Jane Ainsworth

Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, University of Leicester, Leicester; Classics for All, Leicester

Alice Case

Classics for All, London

What was life like in Roman Britain on a wet Tuesday morning for a Bulgarian soldier serving the Empire in Roman Colchester, or for a young child living at Vindolanda? In collaboration with several higher education research partners, the charity Classics for All has developed a range of pioneering enquiry-based resources that support the Key Stage 2 primary history curriculum and encourage pupils to use critical thinking skills to ask and answer questions about everyday life in Roman Britain. We will discuss strategies for engaging pupils with and encouraging them to critically evaluate a range of primary source materials that reveal a diverse picture of life in Roman Britain on a local level. We will also demonstrate how your pupils’ enquiry-based work can be formally accredited and rewarded through a new Independent Project Qualification. 

Friday: 12.00–13.00

Key Stage 2

Supporting children with SEND in history lessons

Sue Temple

University of Cumbria, Carlisle

Similar to the session last year in Bristol, we will explore some ways in which to support primary-aged children with SEND in history lessons, using a variety of approaches. We will consider some theory but most of the session will be practical things that you can incorporate in your lessons or things to think about when you are planning your lessons. We will be exploring how teachers can support children with concentration, speaking and listening, and reading and writing, but not children who would typically be taught in a PRU or SEND school. EAL children would also benefit from some of the activities and approaches considered. 

Friday: 12.00–13.00

Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2

Teaching about ‘these islands’: implications for planning and teaching in the primary classroom

Paul Bracey

Consultant; Historical Association Primary Committee

The first aim in the National Curriculum indicates that pupils should ‘Know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative from the earliest times to the present day…’ What do we mean by ‘these islands’? What are the implications of this for the way in which we plan and teach history in the primary classroom? This workshop will particularly focus on ways in which these questions can be addressed at Key Stage 2, using examples from prehistoric time to the more recent past.

Friday: 14.00–15.00

Key Stage 2

Developing disciplinary knowledge in history

Juli Ryzop and Alex Pethick

Knowledge Schools Trust, London

This session will focus on how we can develop disciplinary knowledge through a knowledge-rich primary curriculum. We will look at how we can ensure that children build a deep understanding of the discipline of history, including how historians study the past and construct accounts. Using examples from the Knowledge Schools Trust Primaries, we will look at how a well-sequenced, specified curriculum can build disciplinary knowledge from Early Years to Year 6.

Friday: 14.00–15.00

Early Years, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, Cross-phase/transition, Key Stage 3, Teacher educators

What/who/where to cover in Key Stage 1 local history?

Chris Trevor

Consultant

How do you decide which ‘significant historical events, people and places in their own locality’ to include in your Key Stage 1 curriculum?

This session will provide guidance and step-by-step suggestions for making this National Curriculum requirement engaging for teachers and children alike. There will be time for discussion and suggestions, whether you are a face-to-face delegate or -you are watching ‘live’ as a virtual delegate online, via the chat option. Opportunities for delegates to share good practice on their chosen specific suggestions for their own schools will be provided, offering ideas and inspiration so that you can apply the same thought processes when making your own selections in your own locality. Chris will share websites and Historical Association resources that will support your Key Stage 1 local history, wherever you are!

Friday: 16.30–17.30

Key Stage 1

Why is it intimidating to teach Black and Brown history?
Paula Sofowora

Author and lawyer

Why is it intimidating to teach Black and Brown history and how can you make the subject more expansive and engaging? Paula Sofowora shares personal insights into her life growing up as a British Nigerian in the UK, including being fostered as a baby by an English family, attending private boarding school aged six, and how, against all odds, she was called to the English Bar and is now a self-publisher of multicultural children’s books. In this interactive session, Paula will explore why it may be intimidating to teach Black and Brown history, and how you might overcome this in the classroom. She will discuss why it is important to understand privilege, challenge negative stereotypes and never judge a book by its cover, and illustrate what difference this might make with two case studies: Olaudah Equiano and the Kingdom of Benin.

Friday: 16.30–17.30

Key Stage 2

Early Islamic history – fascinating, relevant and powerful to teach!

Stuart Tiffany

Consultant

The session introduces delegates to the early Islamic civilisation as part of the non-European study requirement of the National Curriculum, and discusses why it’s a brilliant unit of history to teach. The session has the following structure:

1) Chronologically, where does the civilisation sit alongside the wider primary history curriculum?
2) Geographically, where did the civilisation begin and expand over?
3) Enquiry questions that can lead the study 
4) What was it like to be a Muslim and a non-Muslim within the civilisation?
5) The Abbasids and the remarkable city of Baghdad
6) Links to the taught narrative of British history
7) Why I adore this unit of history!

 The session will be a combination of lecture-style delivery and workshop to convey aspects of theory and how this can look in the classroom. 

Saturday: 10.45–11.45

Key Stage 2

Exploring ideas of sustainability through environmental and landscape history

Karin Doull

Consultant

Increasing emphasis is being placed on the importance of teaching children about climate change and sustainability. History too can contribute to children’s understanding of these concepts. It provides the ‘long view’ that enables to children to put human interactions with the environment into a context. It allows them to explore the actions of past societies and look for similarities and differences. This workshop will present some key ideas around environmental and landscape history. It will suggest some practical activities that can be used in the primary classroom to help children look at humans’ past interactions with their environment. It will also make links across the curriculum, allowing children to investigate the relationship of people in the past with their world and tracing connections from past to present.

Saturday: 10.45–11.45

Key Stage 2

Why is it important to have rivers flowing through your primary history curriculum?
Chris Trevor

Consultant

This session will look at how settlements on rivers could be a substantive concept or ‘golden thread’ that flows through the Key Stage 2 history curriculum, from prehistoric times to the present day, and with meaningful links to Key Stage 2 geography locational and place knowledge, geographical skills and fieldwork. Key Stage 1 may incorporate significant events in their local history, e.g. the opening of bridges, or how a river can play an important role in the past, e.g. the Great Fire of London. There will be regular references to National Curriculum global history units and suggestions about how to make strong links to your own local history and the geographical setting of your local town or city, providing cohesion in your curriculum. Time will be provided for discussion and interactive activities, which you can use in your classroom.

Saturday: 12.00–13.00

Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2

Into the unknown – a study of explorers at Key Stages 1 and 2

Susie Townsend

University of Roehampton, London

The world of exploration  is a fascinating topic to teach, but what do we mean by an explorer and how can we use this theme to introduce greater diversity to Key Stage 1 and 2? 

This session focuses on how to develop children’s understanding of first-order concepts and allow them to look at history from a more global perspective. It challenges stereotypical views and develops subject knowledge through group discussion and layered learning.   Reading, role play and revelry – it should all be present in this interactive workshop!

Saturday: 12.00–13.00

Early Years, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2

Linking the ancient world – Egypt, Greece and Rome

Glenn Carter

Ingleby Mill Primary School, Stockton-on-Tees; Historical Association Primary Committee

Creating meaningful links across units helps children to see that history is not simply a series of disconnected people and civilisations. By introducing concurrent people in a topic, a bevy of questions comes flooding in: Did they know about each other? What was their relationship? How similar or different were they? This helps to provide meaningful context, which also helps to build on prior learning and sets up pathways for future learning too. It also helps to cover tricky concepts like trade, taxation, conflict, migration and settlement.

Saturday: 14.00–15.00

Key Stage 2

Writing as an historian: creating robust cross-curricular links between history and English

Sarah Whitehouse

University of the West of England, Bristol

This workshop will explore how history can be used to establish robust cross-curricular links with English in order to promote children to write as historians. The focus will be on oracy and writing, and is suitable for Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2. You will be engaged and inspired by how a number of historical sources, including fiction texts, can be used to develop historical interpretation. The workshop will demonstrate how teachers can utilise time and these interpretations to ensure that meaningful and purposeful cross-curricular links can be made to support a range of successful writing outcomes, where children are taught to discuss, inform, explain or entertain. Links will be made with the National Curriculum and the recent subject review for history.

Saturday: 14.00–15.00

Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, Cross-phase/transition, Teacher educators

Weighing significance: what makes a turning point at Key Stage 2?

Andrew Wrenn

Consultant

This practical workshop will consider how to identify and teach turning points in history at Key Stage 2, particularly taking into account National Curriculum requirements to teach a study unit that extends chronological knowledge beyond 1066. Examples of substantive knowledge will include the first railways and the Battle of Britain. Criteria for judging the significance of such turning points will be considered.

Saturday: 15.15–16.15

Key Stage 2

Referencing digital and historical mapping to develop concepts across primary history.

Judy Clarke

Leeds Trinity University

This session uses digital mapping to identify and secure links across the history and geography (primary) National Curriculum programmes of study, promoting concepts and research skills across both subjects and supporting transition to Key Stage 3. Engaging and challenging, this approach uses inclusive visual resources to develop pupil enquiries across local, national and global history. Digital (mapping) software enables pupils to evaluate and record continuity and change. Outcomes celebrate pupil achievement and provide valuable evidence for subject-focused formative and summative assessments.

Saturday: 15.15–16.15

Early Years, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, Cross-phase/transition, Teacher educators

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The Historical Association, c/o Mosaic Events
Tower House, Mill Lane, Askham Bryan, York, YO23 3FS